Social Vision

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Social Vision

Social Vision

Social Vision is a breakthrough work of scholarship by Professor Philip Wexler, a leading sociologist and expert on education. Wexler distills Schneerson’s voluminous public teachings, letters, and private conversations to make his ideas accessible to the general reader, and demonstrates the enduring relevance of Schneerson’s teachings to the manifold crises of modern life, politics, and culture.

Wexler delves deeply into the ways that religious ideas seminally shape society. Juxtaposed with what Max Weber called “the spirit of capitalism,” Schneerson’s Hasidic worldview is compellingly framed as a practical path that can help us create a better future for all humanity. Schneerson was not simply a religious figure, but also a great philosopher who boldly upended conventional polarizations between tradition and progress, religion and science, mysticism and society. Social Vision tells the story of how Schneerson not only channeled his ideas into a global Jewish renaissance in the aftermath of the Holocaust, but also articulated a universal vision whose influence continues to shape better policymaking for a better world.

Reviews and endorsements

“... may well become the foundation of fresh sociological thought ... a model for socially meaningful scholarly writing ...”

 — JONATHAN GARB, Gershom Scholem Professor of Kabbalah,The Hebrew University of Jerusalem

 

 “... consistently insightful ... this book can elevate your mind and your soul ...”

 — JOSEPH TELUSHKIN, author of Rebbe: The Life and Teachings of Menachem M. Schneerson, the Most Influential Rabbi in Modern History

 

“an overarching, knowledgeable and ambitious study that challenges the great divide between religion and society, modernity and theology, faith and political action, while breaking new ground for social theory.”

 

— YOTAM HOTAM, Faculty of Education, University of Haifa



9780824550387
Hardcover /
Dimensions:
HERDER & HERDER, 2019

Keywords:
Religion, Theology
Categories:
Theology